IRVINE WELSH

He was born on September 27, 1958 in Leith, Edinburgh (Scotland), the son of a waitress and a dock worker who also worked as a carpet seller. Welsh, a lover of football and rock music, played in punk groups during his youth before working in different trades and studying Business Administration and Management at Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh. Influenced by people like Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Alasdair Gray, Charles Bukowski, Anthony Burgess, Hunter S. Thompson or William S. Burroughs, the Scottish author made his debut as a novelist in the early 1990s with "Trainspotting" (1993), a book about a group of young people from Edinburgh getting into trouble with drugs, sex ... in a realistic, harsh, intense exhibition, with traces of black humor.

 

This novel was made into a film in 1996 by Danny Boyle with Ewan McGregor as the main character. A year after "Trainspotting" appeared "Acid House" (1994), a collection of stories and a short novel about football, drugs, changing identities, pop artists ... In "Nightmares Of The Marabou" (1995) Irvine focused on Roy Strang, an ultra football fan who is in a coma after the rape of a young woman and recalls his experiences in Scotland and South Africa. Welsh returned to the short story and his usual themes of drugs, youthful rebellion and sex with "Ecstasy" (1996). Two years later he published "Scum" (1998), a novel centered on a corrupt, misanthropic, racist policeman, friend of porn and drugs, named Bruce Robertson. This film was adapted to the cinema with James McAvoy in the title role. More drugs with singular characters and addicts, suburbs, description / social criticism, hooligan approach, sarcastic, and criminality with initiation in "Cola" (2001), reunion between friends and their transformations over the years. Welsh published a sequel to "Trainspotting" in "Porno" (2002).

 

Subsequently, some of his characters reappeared in the short story book "Col Reheated" (2009) and in "Skagboys" (2012), the prequel to "Trainspotting". In the novel “Secretos De Alcobas De Los Grandes Chefs” (2006) he used characters in counterpoint to his frequent thematic obsessions. Shortly after, he published the book of stories "If You Like School, You'll Love Work" (2007), with a place for the desert environment, homophobia, snobbery, a Korean restaurant ... In "Crime" (2008) he created a police character, Inspector Ray Lennox, involved in pedophilia issues. Other titles in his bibliography are “La Vida Sexual De Las Gemelas Siamelas” (2014), a story set in Miami about the cult of the body, sexuality and trash TV and “Un Polvo en Conditions” (2015). “The Blade Artist” (2016) and “Dead Men’s Trousers” (2018) are his last novels, both starring Mark Renton. The British writer Irvine Welsh was born on September 27, 1958 in Leith, Edinburgh (Scotland), the son of a waitress and a dock worker who also worked as a carpet seller. Welsh, a lover of football and rock music, played in punk groups during his youth before working in different trades and studying Business Administration and Management at Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh. Influenced by people like Louis-Ferdinand Céline, Alasdair Gray, Charles Bukowski, Anthony Burgess, Hunter S. Thompson or William S. Burroughs, the Scottish author made his debut as a novelist in the early 1990s with "Trainspotting" (1993), a book about a group of young people from Edinburgh getting into trouble with drugs, sex ... in a realistic, harsh, intense exhibition, with traces of black humor.

This novel was made into a film in 1996 by Danny Boyle with Ewan McGregor as the main character. A year after "Trainspotting" appeared "Acid House" (1994), a collection of stories and a short novel about football, drugs, changing identities, pop artists ... In "Nightmares Of The Marabou" (1995) Irvine focused on Roy Strang, an ultra football fan who is in a coma after the rape of a young woman and recalls his experiences in Scotland and South Africa. Welsh returned to the short story and his usual themes of drugs, youthful rebellion and sex with "Ecstasy" (1996). Two years later he published "Scum" (1998), a novel centered on a corrupt, misanthropic, racist policeman, friend of porn and drugs, named Bruce Robertson. This film was adapted to the cinema with James McAvoy in the title role. More drugs with singular characters and addicts, suburbs, description / social criticism, hooligan approach, sarcastic, and criminality with initiation in "Cola" (2001), reunion between friends and their transformations over the years. Welsh published a sequel to "Trainspotting" in "Porno" (2002). Subsequently, some of his characters reappeared in the short story book "Col Reheated" (2009) and in "Skagboys" (2012), the prequel to "Trainspotting".